UN Special Report: US “leads the world in income and wealth inequality”

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty published a condemnation of the wealth gap in the United States, citing disparities between the U.S. and other developed nations.

The U.S. has the highest rate of income inequality of Western countries, according to the May 2018 report submitted to the U.N. Human Rights Council. Compared to other nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the U.S. also has the highest rate of youth poverty, infant mortality, and incarceration.

The report states that the framing of the U.S. as “the land of opportunity” does not match the modern day reality in which the nation has the lowest rate of social mobility of any rich country. The special Rapporteur attributes these statistics to the policy stances of government bodies, writing that “the persistence of extreme poverty is a political choice made by those in power.”

The Foodbank recognizes the interlocking of hunger and poverty and aims to “shorten the line” by helping people rise above the circumstances that lead them to need food assistance. We offer aid to those applying to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and other public assistance programs. The Foodbank also employs former inmate: one  third of our current employees were previously incarcerated.

The U.N. Report offers many suggestions to policymakers to address the income gap in the U.S. Key among them is recognizing the social and economic impact of inequality.

“The United States is alone among developed countries in insisting that, while human rights are a fundamental importance, they do not include rights that guard against dying of hunger, dying from a lack of access to affordable health care or growing up in a context of total deprivation,” the report states.


The Foodbank and CareSource Partner up in Mass Food Distributions

UD’s Welcome Stadium on Edwin C. Moses Boulevard is usually bustling with cars lining up to park as people gather to watch the University of Dayton Flyers’ basketball team play against other colleges. The crowd is excited to participate as their local team scores big points.

But, once a year, a different crowd shows up at the stadium’s parking lot. Cars line up in anticipation as The Foodbank and CareSource set up pallets of food that will be given away to everyone in line. This year, on September 28th, the first car got in line at 3:30 am to receive fresh produce. Volunteers hand out items like corn, potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, and watermelon as the cars drive through the line and then head back home. The Ohio Poultry Association passes out free cartons of eggs as well.

As the cars go home, they take their fresh produce to their family, hungry and tired. In Montgomery County over 93,000 (or 1 in 6) people struggle with food insecurity. They don’t have enough money to afford a healthy meal for every member of their family. Some may be working two or three jobs just to pay bills, others may have just gotten laid off. Whatever their circumstances, events like this and food pantries in their area are there to lend a helping hand and make sure they don’t go to bed hungry.

This year, 1,702 families came to the mass food distribution at Welcome Stadium and left with food to provide a few more meals on their kitchen table.