Federal assistance programs are especially critical for the disabled community

Federal assistance programs are especially critical for the disabled community

1 in 5 SNAP households has a member with disabilities

By Emily Gallion, Grant & Metrics Manager/Advocacy Manager, and Caitlyn McIntosh, Volunteer & Intake Support

Despite assistance programs for disabled individuals, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), they are more likely to experience food insecurity than their able-bodied peers. Strikingly, 1 in 5 SNAP households have at least one disabled member.

Studies show that poverty rates are high among disabled Americans. In 2019, the poverty rate for this population was nearly 27%, which was more than twice the rate for able-bodied individuals.

Disabled people also may have difficulties accessing charitable food assistance, including transportation barriers, trouble preparing food received from a pantry, and inaccessible food distribution measures. This can be largely impacted by the type of disability they are living with.

One study from Syracuse University identifies work-limiting disability, physical limitations, and cognitive limitations all increase the risk of food insecurity in their own unique ways.

Those with work-limiting disabilities can use their work history to lean on federal programs like SSDI and SSI. Physical limitations may require more support from community resources like home delivery programs or transportation providers, as their independence may be hindered due to mobility difficulties.

Currently, there are no social programs that address the food needs of those living with cognitive limitations. Memory loss, confusion, and trouble managing money significantly raise the risk of food insecurity in this population.

Federal regulation requires The Foodbank and our partner agencies to ensure equal access for our disabled clients. We also host twice-weekly drive-thru food distributions, which may be a good fit for individuals with mobility issues. 

Despite these accommodations, federal programming, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), are especially critical for this population. SNAP allows recipients to purchase food on their own schedule and according to their own preferences or health-related dietary concerns.

It is also worthy to note that food insecurity, for disabled and able-bodied people alike, is a public health issue. One study found that disabled individuals who also experienced food insecurity were more likely to report poor physical health, poor mental health, and underutilization of health care services.

 

SNAP: Strengths and Limitations

SNAP currently includes measures that support individuals experiencing food insecurity. People who qualify for SSI or SSDI automatically qualify for SNAP benefits as well. 

However, not everyone who qualifies for this program receives these benefits. Research indicates that only 68% of people who receive SSI also receive SNAP benefits. The application process for SNAP can be a barrier for this population.

The Foodbank conducts SNAP application assistance to help streamline the process and pre-screen clients for eligibility. Those interested in applying for SNAP are encouraged to call our hotline at 937-476-1486 or fill out the online interest form here

While organizations like The Foodbank that conduct SNAP outreach can help more people access these benefits, simpler solutions exist. Some states have implemented Combined Application Projects (CAP), which help people apply for both SSI and SNAP at the same time. 

Disabled individuals who receive SNAP benefits, or who are 60 years or older, are also able to deduct out-of-pocket medical expenses over $35 from their countable income, which can help them qualify for a higher SNAP benefit. However, this deduction is underutilized: only 9 percent of SNAP households with disabled members claimed this deduction.

According to the Food Research Access Center, there are two major ways this issue can be addressed. One is for organizations serving disabled individuals to conduct outreach to increase awareness of the deduction, and another is for states to implement a Standard Medical Deduction (SMD). 

The SMD provides a standardized amount to individuals who are able to verify expenses over $35 per month. This amount varies based on which state has implemented the policy. The SMD also prevents recipients from having to track every medical expense that may qualify for the deduction, which can be burdensome.

Disabled people and able-bodied people alike can also benefit from the same improvements to SNAP. These include measures that simplify application and recertification processes, provide greater access to prepared foods, and increased benefit payments.

To learn more about how federal food programs can be more inclusive for disabled people, visit Feeding America’s resource here.

 


Three updates to federal nutrition programs for children

Three updates to federal nutrition programs for children

Everything you need to know about changes to P-EBT, student lunches, and summer meals

By Emily Gallion, Grant & Advocacy Manager, and Caitlyn McIntosh, Volunteer & Intake Specialist

In recent months, the United States Department of Agriculture has announced several extensions to temporary provisions to serve children during the pandemic. These include policies related to The Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer (P-EBT), the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP).

Here’s what you need to know about eligibility to these programs:

  1. P-EBT extended through summer

The Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer (P-EBT), which provides additional funds for qualifying families with children, has been extended through summer 2021.

Families who qualify will receive two payments of $375 in benefits for each child. Families already enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or P-EBT should have received their benefits on their existing card June 30. First-time recipients should receive a new card mid-July.

There is no application process for this program. If you believe you qualify and have not received additional funds, call the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services Hotline at 1-866-244-0071.

Children who meet any of the following criteria will qualify for the additional summer benefits:

  • Children eligible for free or reduced cost meals at school
  • Children who attend a school where every child receives free meals
  • Children under the age of six in SNAP households

Receiving P-EBT benefits will not impact your immigration status. As of April 2021, the public charge rule — which barred visa applicants determined at risk of becoming dependent on government assistance — is no longer in effect.

For more information on P-EBT, visit http://ohiopebt.org/.

 

2. National school lunch program to include all students next school year

The Ohio Department of Education received approval from the United States Department of Agriculture to offer free lunch and free breakfast to all students at schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) for the 2021-2022 school year.

To see if your school district participates in the NSLP, you can search this database here: http://ohiopebt.org/NSLP.php.

We are pleased to see this step towards ensuring that every child has enough to eat while at school. Students who experience food insecurity are more likely to experience other challenges, including attendance issues, worse educational outcomes, and poor physical and mental health.

Making school lunches free for all students eliminates the burden of applying, which can be a barrier for low-income households. It also addresses the issue of student lunch debt and the issue of “lunch shaming,” when students are given alternate meals or otherwise singled out for not having lunch money.

School lunches provide important nutritional support to all students. One study released this year found that schools were the single greatest source of healthy meals for children.

 

3. Summer meal waivers extended

The USDA has extended waivers to the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) that allow for more flexibility at sites.

This program, which provides free healthy meals in low-income areas during summer months, was designed to prevent children and teens from going hungry when school is not in session. These sites serve anyone 18 and younger.

The waivers include:

  • Meals can be picked up or delivered, rather than being eaten on-site
  • Meals may be served outside standard times
  • Parents and guardians are allowed to pick up meals on behalf of their children
  • Waives the requirement that “open sites” be located in areas where at least half of children are in low-income households.

To find a summer meal site near you, use this search tool.